Vol 06: CPL/ATPL Meteorology for Professional Pilots (January 2016) - GST Excl

Vol 06: CPL/ATPL Meteorology for Professional Pilots (January 2016) - GST Excl

Regular price $76.52

Quick Overview

Volume 6 is a very substantial reference manual for studies towards the Commercial Pilot Licence (CPL) and the Airline Transport Pilot Licence (ATPL).  It covers all the requirements laid down in the syllabuses for the two licences and does so in a manner that is easy to read and understand.

Details

The Commercial/Airline Trainsport Pilot Series - Volume 6,  Meteorology for Professional Pilots

For professional pilots the meteorology subject is extensive.  Not only is there a requirement to know the basics covered in the PPL edition - Weather to Fly (Volume 3), there are also advanced aspects that must be learned and understood.  For example, Upper Level Meteorology including jet streams, thermal winds, and vorticity.  Also covered are Tropical Meteorology including tropical cyclones, trade winds, and El Nino principles, Angular Momentum of the Atmosphere including long waves and short waves, zonal index and blocking anticyclones.  Also, Hazardous Meteorological Conditions including wind shear and downbursts, volcanic ash, icing and turbulence.  And many others.  All these topics are explained in simple terms and supported by numerous diagrams and graphs.

Meteorology for Professional Pilots is a major reference which is superior to many other similar texts because it covers more topics, explains them more thoroughly and employs a style of writing that encourages learning.

Even though the book is primarily written for the Southern Hemisphere, there are so many subjects that apply globally that it also serves as very useful reference text for people studying in the Northern Hemisphere.  In this respect it is worth noting that meteorological documentation involving low and high-level forecasts and reports, include both New Zealand domestic and International services.

A Sample Examination towards the end of the book contains two parts, Part I posing questions on the theory of meteorology and Part II, dealing with documentation.  The questions are so wide ranging that candidates for the examination should be very well prepared.

Even some professional meteorologists have a copy of Meteorology for Professional Pilots on their bookshelf.